The case of the creepy company

Case of the creepy ccompany

Will your new job be just right or a howling fright?

Starting a new job can be a scary proposition. Are you going to like it? Will it be everything the company promised? Are you jumping out of the frying pan into the fire?

The answer to allaying your anxiety lies in doing thorough research on the company you’re considering before you ever accept the offer. In addition to the qualifications for the job, you should also look for clues about things like the company’s mission, values and culture.

To help with your research, here is a list of some spooky signs that your new dream job may really be a nightmare.

 The headless company

You’ll undoubtedly find polished headshots of the company’s leadership on its website, but can you find any other employee stories? The people who are in the trenches every day can offer first-person perspectives you won’t get from slick website copy. Ideally, you’ll be able to find stories from people who work in the same position and/or department that you’re considering.

The social media ghost town

If you’re like most people, social media is the first place you’ll look for information on a company. If you find an abandoned Facebook page with no posts since way back in 2015, and an Instagram with exactly three photos, it’s a sign that the company isn’t social savvy and perhaps not very current in its thinking.

The case of the missing job description

While a bulleted list of required skills is helpful, it won’t give you a complete picture of your role. A good job description will give insight into such things as:

  • The company’s culture
  • The culture of your specific department
  • How this role contributes to the company as a whole
  • The kind of technology you’ll be working with
  • What kind of team you’ll be working with

The clues that don’t add up

At face value, most companies are going to project an awesome company culture, but sometimes candidates can receive misinformation either in their own search or directly from employees. Maybe a recruiter boasts a lively office environment with volunteer activities every quarter, but when you show up for your interview you only notice a couple of disgruntle employees in cubicles, and when you ask about the last volunteering event your interviewer participated in they raise a brow.

As mentioned, researching the company prior to interviewing is of the utmost importance, but if you get the chance to interview onsite, use the opportunity to play detective and see if everything you’ve heard about the company up to that point is seemingly accurate.

We encourage you to practice your company research skills by exploring this website as well as our social sites:

Facebook: facebook.com/CATechnologiesCareers

Instagram: @LifeAtCA

Twitter: @CA_Careers.

You can also follow #LifeAtCA for photos and stories from our people around the world.

If you’d like to explore careers with CA Technologies, you can search our open jobs here, or join our Talent Community to be notified when jobs matching your interests are added.

 

Cathy Bible

Senior Marketing Specialist, Talent Acquisition

Follow me on Twitter > @thecathybible

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Five tips to successfully prepare for your job interview

Five tips to prepare for your job interview

You never know exactly what you’re going to get in a job interview. On one hand, it could be an engaging, enjoyable experience. On the other, it could feel like a never-ending interrogation. Unfortunately, you don’t have total control over which experience you’ll have. However, you can tilt the odds in your favor by being proactive and thoroughly preparing for your interview. It requires some effort, but it’s worth it!  Proper interview preparation makes your responses to questions more applicable to the job at hand, and can give you a competitive edge over other candidates.

Being prepared can give you more confidence in selling your talents, and help offset some of your interview jitters. Here are five tips to help you prepare for your next interview.

Research

Give the company’s website a thorough look. You should familiarize yourself with their products and services, but also pay attention to their About section and their Mission statements. These are great places to find hints about the company’s culture. Another great way to familiarize yourself with a company’s culture is to review (or stalk) their social media platforms. Scroll through company Facebook and Instagram photos to put some people and imagery behind the mission that the company promotes as their culture.

Review & Print Resume Copies

Updating your resume is a crucial step in preparing for the interview.

  • Make sure your resume clearly highlights your previous responsibilities and successes, and also provides a clear snapshot of the impact you had in those roles. Use bullets to quickly capture the important details.
  • Double check for grammar and spelling errors by reading the text aloud. It’s also always a good practice to let someone else proofread your resume to catch errors that you may have missed.
  • Print off a few hard copies to bring with you to the interview. Even if you sent it electronically, it’s not uncommon for the interviewer to ask for a copy if he or she forgot to print one out ahead of time.

Have Questions for the Interviewer

This is commonly overlooked, but having a couple of relevant questions to ask your interviewer can make a big difference in their perception of you. Have 3-5 questions on standby, and make sure that some of your questions reflect the research you’ve done on the company.

Dress to Impress

Make sure your clothing is clean and ironed, and that you’re exhibiting good hygiene. Does your hair need a quick brushing? Is there anything stuck in your teeth? And while you may need a piece of gum to freshen up from your morning coffee, don’t forget to spit it out before speaking with the hiring team!

Arrive Early

Map out the interview location – know exactly where you are going. Leave enough time to find alternate routes if needed. This can prevent some unnecessary stress and allow you to arrive early enough to gather your thoughts, review your resume, and take a breath before your interview begins. You can also use the extra time to strike up a conversation with the receptionist if there is one. Getting some small talk in right before meeting with the interview team can help loosen your interview tension.

These tips can’t guarantee you will get the job, but you can have the satisfaction that you gave your best effort to make the best possible impression on your potential employer.

Are you looking to make your next career move? Search jobs at CA.

Build an Agile Career Path to Find Your Dream Job

Agile Career Path

How to use agile methodologies in your work life to maintain an agile career.

An “agile career path” might sound like an oxymoron to some. Careers are often thought of as a straight ladder of successive promotions, with a clear beginning and end. But if you look at someone in the top of your field, you’d likely notice a professional history that looks more like a zig-zagged staircase. If you read some of our Day in the #LifeAtCA blog series, you’ll see stories from many CA employees who took on different, lateral challenges for many years to create a strong base for becoming a well-rounded and savvy leader. There are a few different agile-inspired ways you can forge an impressive career.

Defining Your User Story

 Perhaps you’ve heard interview feedback along the lines of whether you were a good “fit” for the role. In that feedback, what were the skills that stood out and which ones were missing? What could you learn or experience to help you check all the boxes for that next promotion?

The first thing you should consider is which roles or departments closely work with yours, but are currently outside of your skillset and experience. If you’re a database engineer, this might include user experience designers or product marketing. Finance graduates trying their hands in planning may also be interested in revenue.  A public relations professional may find social media interesting. No matter the specifics, you should learn what skill gaps you need to overcome and consider the investment it would require to do so. For example:

  • Go to a community college or university to obtain a certificate or additional degree. Don’t forget to ask your employer if they provide tuition reimbursement!
  • Take an online course from a service like CodeSchool, Lynda or YouTube. You can even visit the website for a tool you’d like to become proficient in, as many of these companies provide free tutorial videos.
  • Learn how to become involved in any in-house development programs provided by your employer. For example, CA Technologies offers its employees an award-winning Leadership Development Program and a massive list of online learning courses.
  • Seek out a mentor or participate in online forums focused on your new professional interest.

Impediments and Solutions

 Sometimes a good lateral move is created out of a need to solve a problem. You may have heard a story or two of someone demonstrating a clever way to save money or time in their job and being asked to implement it full-time. Those lightbulb moments are rarely a matter of chance; they tend to come from those who are consistently relentless in identifying problems and figuring out a solution. You may not consciously be scanning your organization or personal work patterns for inefficiencies, but cultivating self-awareness will bring the realizations to mind. You should practice thinking through how you would solve any issues you come across naturally in the workplace. When you finally see that problem for which you have the perfect solution, consider these points to prepare for presenting your clever idea to the boss:

  • Will it save money? How much? How would you measure that?
  • Will it save time (and will that in turn, save money)?
  • Is it something you could implement? If it is a small project, offer to add it to your current to-do list. If it’s going to be a full-time job, you may want to take the plunge and propose a new role for yourself.

Iterative Career Developments

Surprise! A job opening has suddenly captured your eye.  Maybe it’s the exact job you’ve been hoping and training for, or maybe it’s one you never thought about doing until now. What next? Let’s break it down.

If the job opening is at your current company:

Get familiar with the internal transfer process and rules. Many employers give stipulations around length and review scores in your current role. You should also inform your manager that you intend to apply to the role before taking any steps. Be sure to ask for advice from your manager on how to proceed.

If the job opening is at another company:

This is a great time to refresh your resume with your new skills and experience and ensure that your goals are made apparent and relevant. Do your research on Glassdoor, the potential company’s website, and market salary averages. List pros and cons for the new opportunity vs your career path capability at your current company.

No matter how you find the opportunity to flex your resume, it’s all about adding valuable features to reach your goals. As CA’s Rebecca Taylor says, “Don’t plan your career too much – just do something you find interesting, be curious, and take every opportunity you can.”

Looking for your next best agile career move at CA Technologies? Search jobs now.

Rachel Duran
Rachel Duran

Follow me on Twitter > @TheRachelDuran

There is No More Ladder. 3 Ideas to Consider for Your Next Career Move

What if I Said There is No More Career Ladder?

I know, I know…controversial. The concept of climbing the corporate ladder has been the cornerstone in corporate career growth thinking for most of the 21st century. I know within my group of friends and colleagues it has been a staple for those new, in the midst of, and at the pinnacle of their careers. I mean, what would we do if there was no ‘up’ in our personal career journeys, right?! If you’re in line with this ideology, I’m going to surprise you and say, you’re thinking about it ALL wrong.

Of course, we want to grow our careers and continue to learn, but we don’t necessarily need to follow a strict upward path to do so. Think about it as more of a zig zag journey with peaks and valleys. Ultimately you will reach your personal peak, but there may be some plateaus in between as well. My personal career journey is filled with upwards, downwards, and sometimes sideways moves. Along the way I’ve learned some great lessons which help me to move away from the traditional “ladder” thinking when it comes to measuring my personal career success.

My 3 Ideas to Consider When Thinking About Your Next Career Move

#1 – Know What You Want & Develop Yourself

So, you’ve been in your current role for 3 years and think it’s time for a change. Do you know what type of change? More responsibility, new title? What if there was no title available, but there was an opportunity for different responsibilities? Would you take it on? Or are you flying blind? It’s critical in career progression to know what you want to achieve in the long run. Think about your end result and the skill set that you need to get there. Start taking on new projects and new responsibilities. That next role may not necessarily be a promotion, but an opportunity to learn a new skill set and ultimately help you grow in the long term.

#2 – Be Open Minded

I wrote in one of my first blogs for CA about my relocation to the UK with my husband and infant son. Why? Not for a promotion, it was actually a lateral move with a change in some of my responsibilities. At first I was nervous, as I only knew what I knew… my current roll. However, I knew what I wanted and knew this would help me in my journey.

What have I gained? New skills in understanding the local nuances in my regions, along with being able to bring new insight to my team and stakeholders. Not to mention…I have enjoyed the challenge along the way. Remember tip number 1. I knew I wanted a change, to learn more about the international marketplace, and to complete a new challenge while making an impact. Keeping an open mind has helped me to make the best decision for my family and for my career in the long run.

#3 – Say Yes

Now, don’t say yes to everything, but say yes to new opportunities to learn. Your manager asks you to be involved in a new project which will lead to further opportunities…say yes. Interested in developing a new campaign? Why not throw your hat in the ring? I’ll revert back to tip number 2 here, remember to be open minded to opportunities. It’s important to maintain your balance, but starting to think about your career progression from the lateral perspective will help you build your skillset and experience while also providing you growth opportunities in the long run.

Listen, I know we all have goals of growth and if you’re anything like me…ultimately running the world. There is no one rule book to follow, however, if I were to reference our CA DNA – being agile and resilient is extremely important not only to our customers, but also for our personal development and career growth. We’ll all get there in time – just remember career progression is about the journey, there will be ups and down, but as long as you remember these top three tips, you’ll reach your summit.

So, are you ready for your next move? Check out our open roles here and be sure to stay connected with us by joining our talent community.

 

Resume Tips and Linkedin Profile Optimization

Candidate Toolkit Resume Tips

Resume tips and LinkedIn tricks from Craig Fisher, personal brand pro

Do you ever find that submitting your resume to an online application is like dropping it into a black hole?  Maybe your resume isn’t getting the attention it should.

Your odds of getting an interview go way up when a recruiter or hiring manager can find your resume easily online.  Especially if they can find what they are looking for in it quickly and easily.

Skill keywords are crucial for getting your resume noticed.  Where they are placed is equally important.  You must explain properly what you have done and for whom.

At the top of your resume in the summary area, you should list the required skills for the job for which you are applying.  Next to each of these, you should list the number of years experience you have with that skill.  If you have no experience with that skill, just say so, or say “knowledge of” or “training in.”  Also list any core skill that you possess that may be relevant to that job with the years experience next to it. Ditch the generic summary at the top of your resume.

Make sure each skill that you have listed at the top is also shown in the body of the resume in each job where you used that skill so that the reader can see where and how you used each of these skills.  Under each job description, have a summary of skills used.  List the skills again, along with any other skills that were used during that job.

After the title and company name for each job description in the body of your resume, write a short paragraph with details about what the company is and does, and what your main job duty was there.  Although you may think it’s obvious, not every reader of your resume will understand what that company is and what your role was unless you spell it out specifically.

Don’t make the reader do any extra work (like having to click a link to find out more about a company you worked for) to understand exactly what you did and for whom.
In your bullet points under that short paragraph do not just list what you were responsible for.  List accomplishments.  Use numbers and descriptive words to show what your impact was.  “Increased sales” is not enough.  “Increased sales by 15% over 6 months” is better.

Repeat everything you have now done on your resume in your LinkedIn profile.  Use the information that you might include in a cover letter in the top summary portion of your LinkedIn profile.  Include your keywords there, too.  Start the “skills used” section under each job description with your name, like this:

Craig Fisher: Talent Acquisition Manager, Talent Attraction Strategist, Recruiting/Sales Manager, Sales, Business Development, Recruiter, Headhunter, Executive Search, Staff Augmentation, Information Technology Consulting Services; Contract, Temp-to-Perm / Contract-to-Hire, & Full-Time Staffing Recruiting; Executive Search. CIO, CFO, CEO, ERP, Oracle, SAP, Peoplesoft, .Net Application Developers, Project Managers, Business Analysts, DBAs, Software Package Installation/Configuration, Social Media Recruiting/Branding/Twitter Strategy Training

You need keywords that will be specific to what you do in order to help separate your resume from the thousands of resumes that are less specific.  A good recruiter will narrow their search with less generic keywords.  Having these listed multiple times in your resume will help it come up at the top of the search results in Google, Linkedin, Job Boards, and company databases.

See this article on Fishdogs.com >

 

Craig FisherAuthor: Craig Fisher
craig.fisher@ca.com
Connect with me on LinkedIn here

Apply To Jobs In 5 Minutes at CA Technologies

How to Apply to CA Technologies

How to apply through Searchjobs.ca.com

How to reset your password in the Applicant Tracking System

 

Here at CA, we strive to provide the most positive candidate experience for all of our applicants as we know interviewing and making a career transition can be a stressful time. If you ever experience any difficulties while applying with us, please reach out to AmericasTAOps@ca.com and one of our Coordinators will be able to assist you. Happy searching!

 

  • To begin your application process, go to Searchjobs.ca.com. At the top of the screen, click on search jobs

  • You can search jobs based on their title, location, or the date they were posted. Once you find the job you wish to apply to, click on it to open more details on the role.

  • Click on Apply Now and select how you would like to submit your supplication.
    • By selecting to apply with a social profile the portal will request you to sign in to the social media site and use any relevant information to help complete your application.

  • To create a profile using only your email address choose the Apply Now option from the drop down and fill out the requested information.

How to Apply to CA Technologies

  • By selecting to apply with a social profile, you will only need to create a password. The other information will populate from your social profile.

  • In the “My Documents” tab, you have the option to upload a resume and a cover letter.

  • Fill out the information requested in the “Profile Information” tab.

  • Fill out the information in the “Job-Specific Information” tab.

  • Once you have filled out the information, hit submit at the bottom of the page.

  • If you are identified as the final candidate, you will receive an email requesting you to complete final application steps.

  • Click on View/Edit Application to return to your application and fill out the remaining questions.
    • Enter your email address and password that you previously created.

  • Fill out the remaining application questions, and then hit submit at the bottom of the page.

How to Apply to CA Technologies

Once you have done so, you have successfully applied to the requisition!

How to reset your password

  • Select “Forgot your password”.

How to Apply to CA Technologies

  • Type in your email address you have used previously and select

How to Apply to CA Technologies

How to Apply to CA Technologies

  • Check your email for an email from CA Technologies titled “Password Reset” Please check your spam folder if you do not see the email.
  • Open the e-mail and select the Click Here link.

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  • Enter in your new password and select Submit.

How to Apply to CA Technologies

  • Select Sign in

How to Apply to CA Technologies

  • Enter your Email Address and Password and select Sign In and continue to apply.

How to Apply to CA Technologies